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Housing

Bigger Better Faster More (September 2005)

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Bigger Better Faster More (September 2005). This new report from Policy Exchange shows that in countries where local councils have to "compete for every inhabitant" they successfully plan for better and cheaper homes in sustainable, green communities. Authors Alan W. Evans and Oliver Marc Hartwich launch their next report Bigger Better Faster More - Why some countries plan better than others. The authors visited Germany, Switzerland, Ireland and Australia to investigate how these countries plan for development. Like the UK, all four countries have experienced pressure on their housing markets because of growing populations, smaller households, longer lifespans, immigration and increases in wealth. Some have adjusted to these changing conditions and continue to provide bigger and more affordable homes in green cities. But others have not.

 

By Policy Exchange, UK.

Housing Policy Resource.


Clone Town Britain

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Clone Town Britain. The survey results on the bland state of the nation, reveals for the first time, the balance between clone towns, border towns and home towns in the UK. Clone Town Britain shows how retail spaces once filled with a thriving mix of independent butchers, newsagents, tobacconists, pubs, bookshops, greengrocers and family owned general stores are fast being filled with faceless supermarket retailers, fast-food chains, mobile phone shops and global fashion outlets. But as nef's report shows, Britain doesn?t have to become a nation of clone towns. The homogenisation of high streets is not benign or inevitable. Just as regulatory changes have allowed it, the right changes can begin to turn back the tide.

 

By New Economics Foundation, UK.

Housing Policy Resource.


From New Towns to Growth Areas: Learning from the Past

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From New Towns to Growth Areas: Learning from the Past. There are critical lessons for the Growth Areas that can be drawn from the successes and failures of previous housing growth policies. Although the New Towns programme was developed and delivered in a very different political and policy climate, many of the issues that the Government, the New Towns Development Corporations and local authorities grappled with are similar to those that will need to be addressed in the Growth Areas. This paper draws out key lessons from the New Towns experience which should be considered in relation to the Growth Areas. By Jim Bennett.

 

By Institute for Public Policy Research, UK.

Housing Policy Resource.


Shrinking to Grow? The Urban Regeneration Challenge in Leipzig and Manchester

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Shrinking to Grow? The Urban Regeneration Challenge in Leipzig and Manchester. Both Leipzig and Manchester have experienced a severe loss of population: Manchester over a long period since the middle of the twentieth century; Leipzig sharply, after reunification. While both cities have greatly improved their city centres and can claim many regeneration successes, both have, at best, stemmed their population losses. Linked to this demographic shrinkage has been the presence of a large stock of low-demand housing. Given this, and the potential for future population loss ? especially in Leipzig, with falling birth rates nationally ? in this study the authors asked whether these two cities could plan for an economically sound contraction in their populations. They set out scenarios for future household numbers in both cities and consider the implications of a future loss of households. By Alan Mace, Nick Gallent, Peter Hall, Lucas Porsch, Reiner Braun, Ulrich Pfeiffer.

 

By Anglo-German Foundation, UK, Germany.

Housing Policy Resource.