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Human Rights

Religious Leaders, Members of Congress, Entertainers, Civil Rights Leaders Lead Worldwide Clemency

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Religious Leaders, Members of Congress, Entertainers, Civil Rights Leaders Lead Worldwide Clemency Call for Troy Davis

(Atlanta) -- In the run-up to the scheduled execution of Troy Anthony Davis, and as Amnesty International holds a press conference calling for his clemency Tuesday morning, religious leaders, members of Congress, entertainers and civil and human rights leaders have written letters to the Georgia Board of Pardons and Paroles to ask that its members look at the Davis case with fresh eyes. Nobel-prize winner Rev. Desmond Tutu, singer Harry Belafonte, actor Mike Farrell, Rep. Jesse Jackson, Jr. (D-IL), Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-TX), Sister Helen Prejean, Sam D. Millsap, Jr. (former D.A. of Bexar County, TX), record producer and activist Russell Simmons and Murder Victims Families for Reconciliation are among those who have voiced support for clemency.


By Amnesty International, USA.


Human rights Policy Resource.


Supreme Court Ruling in Scott Panetti Case 'A Much-Needed Step Toward a Humane America,'

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Supreme Court Ruling in Scott Panetti Case 'A Much-Needed Step Toward a Humane America,' Says Amnesty International

Washington, D.C.) -- Amnesty International applauds today's United States Supreme Court ruling in Panetti v. Quarterman, which prevents the execution of a man with severe schizophrenia. "The Supreme Court has taken a much-needed step toward a more humane America," said Larry Cox, executive director of Amnesty International USA (AIUSA). "Perhaps now we can recognize that this country's resources would be much better spent improving the mental health system to help ensure that similarly tragic crimes are not committed in the first place."


By Amnesty International, USA.


Human rights Policy Resource.


Discordant UN Voices on Rights

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Discordant UN Voices on Rights

The UN Human Rights Council was supposed to make the world forget about the disparaged Human Rights Commission. That panel had stained the UN’s reputation through “declining credibility and professionalism,” in the words of former UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan. But in the council’s first year, in some ways it appears to have taken up where the old commission left off. Intended to carry on as the international community’s main forum for addressing rights abuses, the council has singled out Israel’s actions in the Palestinian territories for extraordinary scrutiny, ignored widespread abuses reported in Zimbabwe, Burma, and North Korea, and discontinued the use of special monitors in Belarus and Cuba. The council kept the mandates of many other special monitors but they will now be subject to a new “code of conduct” that could compromise their ability to work effectively, says Human Rights Watch. By Robert McMahon.


By CFR, USA.


Human rights Policy Resource.