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Macro-economic Policy

A New Regional Policy for the UK

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A New Regional Policy for the UK " This report addresses how levels of both productivity and employment in the regions can be improved, and in particular suggests how lagging regions can benefit from policy improvements in areas such as enterprise, innovation, skills, public investment, the housing market and labour market reforms. By John Adams, Peter Robinson and Anthony Vigor of the Institute for Public Policy Research

 

By Institute for Public Policy Research , UK.

Macro Economic Policy Resource.


Manufacturing in the UK

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Manufacturing in the UK " The manufacturing industry has long held a special position for the centre-left in British politics. However, there has been a long-standing lack of clarity about why manufacturing matters, what our ambitions for the sector should be and how we can achieve them. More recently there has been a degree of unwarranted pessimism about the sector, which has indeed suffered a particularly difficult time in the last few years. This report provides a clear and balanced view of the role and prospects for manufacturing, and the appropriate policy response from government. Broad in scope, it examines some of the key elements of economic policy as they apply to the sector including the economic framework, investment, skills, innovation and enterprise. By Richard Brooks and Peter Robinson of the Institute for Public Policy Research

 

By Institute for Public Policy Research , UK.

Macro Economic Policy Resource.


Identifying Anti-Trust Markets

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Identifying Anti-Trust Markets " The identification of markets is a standard feature of anti-trust investigations, and the substantive decision in many cases stands or falls on the precise market definition selected. Market shares are often used to help establish jurisdiction or, more generally, to sort out priorities for anti-trust agencies. Market shares are also sometimes used as an observable measure of market power, meaning that the fact of finding high market shares is sometimes taken to be tantamount to uncovering the existence of market power. The standard test used by most anti-trust authorities to define markets is the so-called SSNIP test (sometimes also called "the hypothetical monopolist test"), which is designed to explore the consequences of a (hypothetical) Small but Significant Non-transitory Increase in Price on the profitability of the (hypothetical) firm that initiates it. By P.A. Geroski and R. Griffith of the Institute for Fiscal Studies.

 

By Institute for Fiscal Studies , UK.

Macro Economic Policy Resource.