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Technology

Preparing Women and Minorities for the IT Workforce: The Role of Nontraditional Educational Pathways

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Preparing Women and Minorities for the IT Workforce: The Role of Nontraditional Educational Pathways

A report by the AAAS Education and Human Resources Programs, AAAS Science & Policy Programs, and the Commission on Professionals in Science and Technology. This study examines the role of nontraditional educational pathways in preparing women and underrepresented minorities for the information technology (IT) workforce. It was sparked by the finding that the nation’s number one producer of bachelor’s degrees in information technology and computer science (IT/CS) was not a major research university, but instead was Strayer University, a for-profit institution with many campuses in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area. Not only was Strayer the top producer overall, but it also produced the largest number of women and African American graduates with baccalaureates in IT/CS. .


By AAAS,USA.


Technology Policy Resource..


Future Technologies

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Future Technologies " Beyond the agricultural and industrial revolutions of the past, a broad multidisciplinary technology revolution is changing the world. This is the message of "The Global Technology Revolution: Bio/Nano/Materials Trends and their synergies with Information Technology by 2015." The effects of new technologies may include significant improvements in human quality of life and and life span, high rates of industrial turnover, lifetime worker training, new class disparities, reduced privacy and the possibility of human eugenics. By Philip Antón, Richard Silberglitt and James Schneider for RAND.

 

By RAND , US

Science and technology Policy Resource.


Proliferation-Resistant Nuclear Power

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Proliferation-Resistant Nuclear Power ."The recent renewed interest in nuclear power, and probably its principal ticket to a robust place in the world's energy future, is its potential contribution to coping with the problem of global warming. To make such a contribution, nuclear power would have to expand ten-fold at least over the next 100 years. Efforts are underway in the US and Europe to design reactor technologies and fuel cycles that are safer, more efficient in their generation of nuclear waste, and more proliferation-resistant than today's systems. If successful, this could have a significant impact upon the way governments view nuclear energy (notwithstanding real concerns about waste disposal and safety). Harold Feiveson in The Journal of the Federation of American Scientists describes developments which could, on paper at least, herald the development of nuclear fuel cycles which states and sub-state organisations find difficult to divert into military uses.

 

By The Journal of the Federation of American Scientists , US.

Science and technology Policy Resource.