Site Upgraded to latest version. If any issues please contact us

Governance

Human Rights, Climate Change, Environmental Degradation and Migration: A New Paradigm debt


alt

Human Rights, Climate Change, Environmental Degradation and Migration: A New Paradigm debt

Climate change and environmental degradation will likely displace millions of people in the coming years, either directly or indirectly. Although today’s international legal framework provides a degree of protection to certain environmental migrants, major gaps in the framework often prevent recognition of their vulnerability and endanger their rights. 


By Migration Policy Institute, , USA.


Governance Policy Resource.

Education Reform in a Changing Georgia: A Tumultuous Decade: Employment Outcomes of Immigrants in the Czech Republic debt


alt

Education Reform in a Changing Georgia: A Tumultuous Decade: Employment Outcomes of Immigrants in the Czech Republic debt

The immigrant population in the Czech Republic has grown considerably over the past 15 years, more than doubling since 2000. The 2000s also brought significant changes to the Czech labor market, and to the profile of migrants coming to the country and settling for the long term—not least because of significant institutional and policy changes resulting from accession to the European Union, as well as the arrival of the economic crisis at the end of the decade. This changing political and economic climate coincides with substantial fluctuations in immigrants’ economic outcomes. >


By Migration Policy Institute, , USA.


Governance Policy Resource.

Curbing the Influence of “Bad Actors” in International Migration debt


alt

Curbing the Influence of “Bad Actors” in International Migration debt

The Transatlantic Council on Migration convened to explore how governments can meaningfully address the powerful market for illegal entry and employment that exists on both sides of the Atlantic, outlining a strategic approach to identify the tools and strengthen the political will necessary to tackle some of the factors—and the migration “bad actors”—that fuel these patterns. This Council Statement assesses the continuum of policies needed to disrupt not only the most obvious patterns of illegal activity, but the underlying conditions that make it possible (and profitable). Governments can neither eradicate all illegal activity, nor can they make borders fully secure. Instead, they must constantly weigh the costs, benefits, and sometimes perverse consequences of deploying resources in one area versus another in order to maximize impact while recognizing the limits of both human and financial capital available for this effort. 


By Migration Policy Institute, , USA.


Governance Policy Resource.