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Health

Biotech Blog—Shopping for Soda Tax Working as Intended in Berkeley


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Biotech Blog—Shopping for Soda Tax Working as Intended in Berkeley

For Berkeley, Calif., to reduce soda sales by 10 percent—and to raise water sales by 16 percent—is a huge public-health victory. It shows that the soda tax enacted in Berkeley is working as intended. And rather than costing the city, the soda tax represents a brand-new revenue stream, which Berkeley is using for important health programs. We hope voters and policymakers elsewhere in the country will review the findings published in PLoS Medicine and press for soda taxes in their communities.


By CSPI, USA,


Health Policy Resource.

Biotech Blog—Shopping for Honesty: Sorting Out Non-GMO Claims


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Biotech Blog—Shopping for Honesty: Sorting Out Non-GMO Claims

This past weekend while grocery shopping at my neighborhood Giant supermarket, I noticed a surprising number of products claiming to be “non-GMO.” For many consumers, those claims probably raise several questions. Are foods that contain ingredients from GMOs (genetically modified organisms) safe?[i] Is the “non-GMO” label claim accurate? Are those label claims just a marketing ploy to get consumers to purchase the product at a higher price?


By CSPI, USA,


Health Policy Resource.

Supermarkets and Convenience Stores Make Last-Ditch Attempt to Withhold Nutrition Information from Their Customers


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Supermarkets and Convenience Stores Make Last-Ditch Attempt to Withhold Nutrition Information from Their Customers

Research shows that consumers want and use calorie labeling at restaurants and other retailers that offer restaurant-type food. Already, many major restaurant chains, supermarkets, and other retailers are displaying calories in advance of the May 5 implementation date.


By CSPI, USA,


Health Policy Resource.

Food Safety Advocates Urge Companies to Oppose “Filthy Food Act”


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Food Safety Advocates Urge Companies to Oppose “Filthy Food Act”

The nation’s leading consumer and food safety organizations are urging 11 of the country’s biggest food manufacturers, retailers, and restaurant chains to oppose the Regulatory Accountability Act, which the groups say would effectively block any new regulations improving food safety. The bill passed the House in January and could be voted on by the Senate as early as May. But food safety experts say that the legislation, which would require officials at the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Food and Drug Administration, and other agencies to seek out the least costly, and not the most beneficial, regulatory approaches to food safety problems, would more accurately be called the “Filthy Food Act.”


By CSPI, USA,


Health Policy Resource.