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Study Finds Nickelodeon Posts Modest Decline in Junk-Food Marketing


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Study Finds Nickelodeon Posts Modest Decline in Junk-Food Marketing

Nearly two-thirds of the food ads on kids’ television powerhouse Nickelodeon were for Baby Bottle Pops, Frosted Flakes, Fruit Gushers, and other junk foods, according to new research published by the Center for Science in the Public Interest. The nonprofit nutrition and food safety watchdog group found that the network—which prides itself on its health and wellness efforts—aired no ads for fruits or vegetables or any public service announcements during the 28 hours of programming CSPI examined. And while the percentage of ads that were for unhealthy food has steadily dropped since CSPI began monitoring Nickelodeon in 2005, the raw number of junk foods remained constant, but for an unexplained one-time drop in 2012.


By CSPI, USA,


Health Policy Resource.

New Research on Why Soda Warning Labels Work


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New Research on Why Soda Warning Labels Work

New research adds to the body of evidence that soda warning labels can produce important public health gains. A study, conducted at the Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics at the University of Pennsylvania and published today in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, examined the impact of warning labels—such as “Safety Warning: Drinking beverages with added sugar(s) contributes to obesity, diabetes, and tooth decay”—on the attitudes of adolescents. It found that warnings can reduce the perception that sugar drinks are healthy or increase energy or focus. The research also provides preliminary evidence that warnings can affect young people’s intentions to buy sugar drinks. This study builds onearlier research that found warning labels may deter parents from buying sugar drinks for their children.


By CSPI, USA,


Health Policy Resource.