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Governance

Global Futures for Canada’s Global Cities

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Global Futures for Canada’s Global Cities

The thesis of Global Futures for Canada’s Global Cities is that the globalization and the information age have led to the economic, political and even democratic ascendancy of global city regions (GCRs). Yet there is sometimes a wide gulf between the potential for these GCRs and their on-the-ground reality. This is especially the case in Canada, where GCRs are fiscally weak and jurisdictionally constitutionless. Accordingly, the analysis focuses on a variety of alternative structures and processes that would allow our GCRs to reach their potential with respect to the knowledge-based economy.


By IRPP, Canada,


Governance Policy Resource.


Quiet Revolution's Grandchildren May Change the Issues and the Tone of the Debate about Quebec's Fut

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Quiet Revolution's Grandchildren May Change the Issues and the Tone of the Debate about Quebec's Future

7 May 2007. SHERBROOKE, Quebec - In the next few years a fascinating debate about Quebec's future will take place across the province when the parents, children and grandchildren of Quebec's Quiet Revolution face each other at Kiwanis Clubs, on TV chat shows and, most importantly, in the National Assembly. The recent election, which returned a minority Liberal government under Jean Charest, showed that the loyalties of Quebecers are divided almost equally among the three groups (and more or less among the three parties) that represent the parents (Parti Québécois, or PQ), the children (the Liberal Party) and the grandchildren (Action Démocratique du Québec, or ADQ).


By  IRPP,Canada.


Governance Policy Policy Resource.


Belonging? Diversity, Recognition and Shared Citizenship in Canada.

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Belonging? Diversity, Recognition and Shared Citizenship in Canada.

February 2007. On October 13-15, 2005, the Institute hosted the third symposium of The Art of the State series at Montebello. Entitled "Diversity and Canada's Future," it was co-chaired by Thomas Courchene and Keith Banting from Queen's University, and Wanda Wuttunee from the University of Manitoba. A collection of the symposium's papers, entitled Belonging? Diversity, Recognition and Shared Citizenship in Canada, will be published in mid-February 2007. Edited by Keith Banting, Thomas J. Courchene and F. Leslie Seidle, the volume will shed light on Canada's approaches to recognizing and accommodating diversity. including instruments of shared citizenship, and their capacity to respond to new pressures and concerns. Analysis of the approaches of certain other countries and the critiques that have emerged will provide a comparative perspective. By Keith Banting (ed.), Thomas J. Courchene (ed.), F. Leslie Seidle (ed.)
Monograph


By IRPP,Canada


Governance Policy Resource..