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Welfare & Social Security

Equal Shares? Building a Progressive and Coherent Asset-based Welfare Policy

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Equal Shares? Building a Progressive and Coherent Asset-based Welfare Policy Tony Atkinson argued in 1972 that narrowing the wide disparities in wealth should be a priority for progressives. Since then, the situation has changed little and indeed it may even have worsened. However, the tone of this publication is optimistic. Policy makers are beginning to discuss the role that wealth or assets play in people?s wellbeing. This has come under the banner of ?asset-based welfare? and its most notable contribution thus far has been the Child Trust Fund. Though important this is only one specific policy. This publication assesses broader implications of asset-based welfare across public policy. How could and should asset-based welfare develop? What is our vision of a more coherent and progressive overall policy? What are the practical policy implications? . Edited by Will Paxton with: Will Paxton, Michael Sherraden, Ros Altman and Elaine Kempson is published by Institute for Public Policy Research

 

By Institute for Public Policy Research , UK, US .

Welfare and Social Security Policy Resource.


Achieving simplicity, security and choice in retirement? An assessment of the government's proposed

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Achieving simplicity, security and choice in retirement? An assessment of the government's proposed pensions reforms In this Briefing Note, we discuss whether or not the government's proposed reforms are likely to help individuals to make choices about how to provide for their retirement that are appropriate to their circumstances. We focus particularly on whether or not the proposals might prompt those individuals who are not thought to be providing sufficiently for their retirement to save more each year or to retire at an older age than might otherwise have been the case. By Carl Emmerson and Matthew Wakefield is published by Institute for Fiscal Studies.

 

By Institute for Fiscal Studies. , UK, .

Welfare and Social Security Policy Resource.


Changing Poverty

Changing Poverty The paper analyses changes in poverty in Britain since 1997. A poverty level of 60 percent of median equivalised income is used. The first part examines the changes that occurred between 1996/7 and 2000/1 as shown by the Family Resources Survey, on which government estimates of Households Below Average Income are based. There was a small reduction in poverty overall and a larger proportionate fall in child poverty. This fall was attributable in part to increased employment and in part to changes in benefits and tax credits which increased for some, particularly for families on low earnings with children, but fell relative to median incomes for many of those without children and not in employment. The second part assesses policy changes implemented or announced for the period 2000/1 to 2003/4 by means of a micro-simulation model, POLIMOD, using a sample from the Family Resources Survey. The impact of policy changes is to reduce poverty compared to its prospects under previous policies. But, relative to a poverty level that rises in real terms in step with median incomes, future reductions in poverty are likely to be small. In order to keep on track towards the goal of halving child poverty by 2010, further policy measures will be required. "Changing Poverty Post-1997" by David Piachaud and Holly Sutherland is published by Centre for the Analysis of Social Exclusion.

 

By Centre for the Analysis of Social Exclusion , UK, .

Welfare and Social Security Policy Resource.